manage your printed-in-paper papers

Hi,

My question is how you manage your printed-in-paper papers (I mean it has been printed in paper).

It sounds not related to Endnote. But I am eager to know the methods.

Before I use Endnote, I try many years ago a method just numbering in Windows Word. I number in every printed-in-paper paper in the UL.

Then align them. When I want to get one paper. I search that Word file, get the number and the printed paper.

One difficult thing for doing this is writing down the whole metadata of a given paper, certainly.

I am wondering if it’s a good idea if using Endnote can help to manage this job.

Creating a field( id ), saving this number and get this printed paper?

Best regards,

chliuisi

At the risk of being reminded that Endnote doesn’t recommendusing them as a number gets reassigned if you move it to a different library, Endnote assigns an unique record number in library, and I routinely used that to organize my printed papers.  Just wrote the number on the top of the printed paper.  - Since I rarely print papers anymore, now using the pdf electronically,  I don’t do it much any more, but I still have the papers filed from pre electronic days, by record number, so I can quickly retrieve a hard copy when needed.  I am still using the same library I created circa 1987 (at least that is the date of record number 3, the first record in my library), so the numbers are still relevant. 

You can display this number in the library display by altering the edit>preferences display settings in Endnote.  The number is also still displayed in the blue bar of the record when you open it. 

I spent time last year scanning old hard copies of assorted research materials and converting them to searchable pdfs which were then added to my EndNote libary(ies).  I retained a few hard copies for backup redundancy but was able to clear a large portion of the paper clutter.

Invest in a scanner with an automatic feeder (or see if your organization or friend will let you use their scanner) as a means of converting hard copies into electronic files which wil be easier to store, manage, search-and-retrieve in EndNote or even as stand-alone files.

I spent time last year scanning old hard copies of assorted research materials and converted them to searchable pdfs which were then added to my EndNote libary(ies).  I retained a few hard copies for backup redundancy but was able to clear a large portion of the paper clutter.

Invest in a scanner with an automatic feeder (or see if your organization or friend will let you use their scanner) as a means of converting hard copies into electronic files which wil be easier to store, manage, search-and-retrieve in EndNote or even as stand-alone files.